Malala Yousafzai wins the Nobel Peace Prize

Malala Yousafzai the Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban.

Malala day

Malala day

Malala Yousafzai won the world over by standing up to religious zealots, but she almost paid the ultimate price. The Taliban is so afraid of educated woman they tried to kill her. The Taliban’s brutality was exposed as Malala elevated her cause globally  enlightening the world and brightening each of our lives.

Malala Yousafzai (Pashto: ملاله یوسفزۍ‎ [mə ˈlaː lə . ju səf ˈzəj];[2] Urdu: ملالہ یوسف زئیMalālah Yūsafzay, born 12 July 1997)[3] is a multi-award-winning Pakistani female education activist and Nobel Peace Prize winner. She is known mainly for human rights advocacy for education and for women in her native Swat Valley, where the local Taliban had at times banned girls from attending school; this has since grown into an international movement. Yousafzai is also the youngest ever recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, having received it at the age of 17 in 2014.

In early 2009, when she was 11–12, Yousafzai wrote a blog under a pseudonym for the BBC detailing her life under Taliban occupation, their attempts to take control of the valley, and her views on promoting education for girls in the Swat Valley. The following summer, aNew York Times documentary by journalist Adam B. Ellick was filmed[3] about her life as the Pakistani military intervened in the region, culminating in the Second Battle of Swat. Yousafzai rose in prominence, giving interviews in print and on television, and she was nominated for the International Children’s Peace Prize by South African activist Desmond Tutu.

On the afternoon of 9 October 2012, Yousafzai boarded her school bus in the northwest Pakistani district of Swat. A gunman asked for her by name, then pointed a pistol at her and fired three shots. One bullet hit the left side of Yousafzai’s forehead, travelled under her skin through the length of her face, and then went into her shoulder.[4] In the days immediately following the attack, she remained unconscious and in critical condition, but later her condition improved enough for her to be sent to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital inBirmingham, England, for intensive rehabilitation. On 12 October, a group of 50 Islamic clerics in Pakistan issued a fatwā against those who tried to kill her, but the Taliban reiterated its intent to kill Yousafzai and her father. Source Wikipedia

Editor in Chief at

Kelli Busey an outspoken gonzo style journalist has been writing since 2007. In 2008, she brought the Dallas Advocate on-line and has articles published by the Reconciling Ministries Network, The Transsexual Menace, The Daily Kos, Frock Magazine the TransAdvocate, the Dallas Voice and The Advocate. Kelli, an avid runner is editor in chief at Planet Transgender which she founded in 2007.

  • 6
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    6
    Shares

Facebook Comments